• Canterbury Band
    Coventry Band
    Husmann Band
  •  

    Any Questions?
    Contact Mr. Bell via email or voicemail at (815) 356-3418.

     

    Lesson 2 Goals: Week of Sept. 21-25
    Play along with our songs below to hear how they go. Our goal is to learn 3 notes and be able to play #5-7 in the book on page 6. You can watch these videos in our Bitmoji Classroom for review:

     

    • How to put it together
    • How to make a sound
    • Play your first 3 notes

     

    Click the Zoom Link in your schedule to attend your 20-min band class on time. See you then.

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Learn Your Notes

  • Learn Your Notes

    Reading music can be fun and rewarding. It can also be challenging for beginning band students. We read notes on lines and spaces. The traditional music staff has five lines and four spaces.

     


     

    Treble Clef (also called G Clef)

     

    Treble_Clef_Notes

     

    Most students are familiar with the treble clef notes from music class. The treble clef is used in the band for flute, clarinet, trumpet, and mallet percussion. We always learn the names of our notes from the bottom up. We can learn the five lines of the treble clef (E-G-B-D-F) using the acrostic "Every Good Boy Does Fine." My personal favorite is "Elvis' Guitar Broke Down Friday," but use any sentence you want to remember the names of the line notes in the treble clef. Again, we always learn the names of our notes from the bottom up. In the treble clef, the space notes spell the word "F-A-C-E."

     


     

    Bass Clef (also called F Clef)

     

    Bass_Clef_Notes

     

    Unless you're a piano player, most students do not know the bass clef notes. The bass clef is used in the band for trombone. We always learn the names of our notes from the bottom up. We can learn the five lines of the bass clef (G-B-D-F-A) using the acrostic "Good Boys Do Fine Always." Use any sentence you want to remember the names of the line notes in the bass clef. Again, we always learn the names of our notes from the bottom up. In the bass clef, the space notes are "A-C-E-G" and I use the acrostic "Ally Cats Eat Garbage." Some students understand the bass clef best if you start on the bottom space and say the musical alphabet (A-B-C-D-E-F-G) as you alternate space, line, space, line, space, line, space. The top line is A and the bottom line is G.

Learn Your Scales

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    Mini Scales

    Within weeks, we can play mini scales using just 3-5 notes.

    Do Re Mi Re Do
    1 2 3 2 1

    Do Re Mi Fa So Fa Mi Re Do
    1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1

     

    Flutes, Trombones, & Mallet Percussion:

    Bb C  D  C  Bb
    1 2 3 2 1

    Bb C D Eb F Eb D C Bb
    1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1

     

    Clarinets & Trumpets:

    C  D  E  D  C
    1 2 3 2 1

    C D E F G F E D C
    1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1

     


     

    Major Scales

    There is a formula to major scales that has do with the distance between the notes (intervals). Using a specific pattern of half steps and whole steps, W W H W W W H, you will notice that in all major scales, the half steps appear between notes 3-4 and between notes 7-8. The interval between all the other notes is a whole step.

    • Like singing? You can think of a major scale as solfege syllables to sing up and down through Do Re Mi Fa So La Ti Do Ti La So Fa Mi Re Do.
    • Like numbers? You can think of a major scale as numbers ascending and descending, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.
    • Like letters? You can also think of a major scale cycling through the musical alphabet, C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C, B, A, G, F, E, D, C.

     

    Within months, we can play major scales.

    Do  Re  Mi  Fa  So  La  Ti  Do
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

     

    Flutes

    G   A   B   C   D   E   F#  G
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

    F  G A Bb C D E F
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

    C  D E F G A B C
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
     

    Clarinets:

    Bb  C   D   Eb  F   G   A   Bb
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

    G  A B C D E F#  G
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

    F  G A Bb C D E F
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
     

    Trumpets

    C   D   E   F   G   A   B   C
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

    Bb  C D Eb F G A Bb
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

    G  A B C D E F# G
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

     

    Trombones

    C   D   E   F   G   A   B   C
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

    Bb  C D Eb F G A  Bb
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

    Ab  Bb  C  Db Eb F G Ab
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

     


     

    Learn ALL 12 Scales

    The single most common scale for band is written below. Students may begin reading music with more confidence after learning this scale. In fact, scales are an important fundamental for students to learn in order to achieve the highest ability in reading music. Learn ALL 12 major scales, but start with this one... 

     

    Flutes, Trombones, & Mallet Percussion:

    Bb  C   D   Eb  F   G   A   Bb
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

     

    Clarinets & Trumpets:

    C   D   E   F   G   A   B   C
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

     

Learn Our Songs

Fun Songs

Take Home Info

Care & Repair

Flute

Instrument Maintenance

To avoid damage, please take your time and be aware of your surroundings as your assemble and put away your instrument.

Assembling the Flute

  1. Hold the head joint in your left hand and the middle joint in your right hand.
  2. Gently twist and insert the head joint into the middle joint.
  3. Make sure that the embouchure hole is directly in line with the middle joint's row of keys.
  4. Hold the assembled middle joint in your left hand and the foot joint in your right hand.
  5. Gently twist and insert the middle joint into the foot joint.
  6. The embouchure hole, keys of the middle joint, and the long rod on the foot joint should all line up.

Packing Up Carefully

Before putting your instrument back in its case after playing, do the following:

  1. Put a clean, soft cloth on the end of your cleaning rod.
  2. Draw the cleaning rod and cloth through the middle joint and foot joint.
  3. Carefully shake the water out of the head joint.
  4. Wipe the outside of each section with a separate polishing cloth to keep the finish clean.
  5. You should have no other materials in your case, except for those it was designed to hold. Do not use force when closing your case or you could damage the instrument.

Oboe

Instrument Maintenance

To avoid damage, please take your time and be aware of your surroundings as your assemble and put away your instrument.

Assembling the Oboe

  1. Soak your reed up to 10 minutes.
  2. Rub a small amount of cork grease on all corks, if needed. Wash your hands.
  3. Hold the upper section with your left hand and the foot joint in your right hand.
  4. Press your fingers over the round tone hole keys.
  5. Grasp the lower section with your right hand.
  6. Again, press your fingers over the round tone hole keys.
  7. Gently twist the upper and lower sections together.
  8. The upper section's bridge key must be directly over the lower section's bridge key.
  9. Hold the instrument with your left hand.
  10. Pick up the bell with your right hand.
  11. Press down on the round bell key, raising it.
  12. Twist the bell onto the cork of the lower section.
  13. The bell bridge must be directly over the bottom bridge key.
  14. Put the reed in your mouth.
  15. Form your embouchure and blow forcefully through the reed to remove excess water.
  16. You should make a loud, bird-like noise.
  17. Carefully insert the cork of the reed all the way into the reed well.

Packing Up Carefully

Before putting your instrument back in its case after playing, do the following:

  1. Carefully remove the reed and blow air through it to remove excess water. Put the reed carefully back into the reed case. Remember, the reeds are expensive!
  2. Take the instrument apart in the reverse order of assembly. Swab out each section with a cloth or feather swab. If the cloth swab has a weight on one end, drop the weight through each section and pull through.
  3. Return each section to the correct spot in the case.
  4. You should have no other materials in your case, except for those it was designed to hold. Do not use force when closing your case or you could damage the instrument.

Clarinet

Instrument Maintenance

To avoid damage, please take your time and be aware of your surroundings as your assemble and put away your instrument.

Assembling the Clarinet

  1. Put the thin end of the reed in your mouth to moisten it thoroughly while assembling your instrument. Rub a small amount of cork grease on all corks, if needed. Wash your hands.
  2. Hold the upper section in your left hand. Press your fingers over the tone holes. Take the lower section with your right hand, and again press your fingers over the tone holes. Gently twist the upper and lower sections together. The upper section's bridge key must be directly over the lower section's bridge key. All tone holes should be aligned.
  3. Twist the bell onto the cork of the lower section. Then twist the wider end of the barrel onto the cork of the upper section.
  4. Twist the mouthpiece into the barrel. The flat side of the mouthpiece should form a straight line with the register key and thumb rest. Place the reed on the mouthpiece.

Reed Placement

  1. Put the thin end of the reed in your mouth to moisten it thoroughly.
  2. Looking at the flat side of the mouthpiece, the ligature screws extend to your right. Slide the ligature up with your thumb.
  3. Place the flat side of the reed under the ligature and against the mouthpiece.
  4. Lower the ligature and position the reed so that only a hairline of the mouthpiece can be seen above the reed.
  5. Gently tighten the ligature screws until they are firm. Do not overtighten!

Packing Up Carefully

Before putting your instrument back in its case after playing, do the following:

  1. Carefully remove the reed, wipe off excess moisture, and return it to the reed case. Remember, each reed costs at least $1.
  2. Remove the mouthpiece and wipe the inside with a clean cloth. Once a week, wash the mouthpiece with warm tap water. Dry thoroughly.
  3. Carefully grab the upper section with your left hand and the lower section with your right hand. Gently twist the sections apart and shake out the excess moisture.
  4. Drop the weight of your chamois or cotton swab through each section and pull through.
  5. Carefully twist and remove the barrel and the bell. Use the chamois or cotton swab to dry off any additional moisture.
  6. As you return each section to the correct spot in the case, check to be sure they are dry and positioned correctly.
  7. You should have no other materials in your case, except for those it was designed to hold. Do not use force when closing your case or you could damage the clarinet.

Saxophone

Instrument Maintenance

To avoid damage, please take your time and be aware of your surroundings as your assemble and put away your instrument.

Assembling the Saxophone

  1. Carefully put the thin end of the reed in your mouth to moisten it thoroughly while assembling your instrument. Rub a small amount of cork grease on the neck cork, if needed. Wash your hands.
  2. Hold the body of the saxophone with your left hand, and remove the end plug. With your right hand, gently twist the neck into the body. Be careful not to bend any keys. Tighten the neck screw.
  3. Carefully twist the mouthpiece on the neck so that approximately 1/2 of the cork remains uncovered. Place the reed on the mouthpiece.

Reed Placement

  1. Put the thin end of the reed in your mouth to moisten it thoroughly.
  2. Looking at the flat side of the mouthpiece, the ligature screws extend to your right. Slide the ligature up with your thumb.
  3. Place the flat side of the reed under the ligature and against the mouthpiece.
  4. Lower the ligature and position the reed so that only a hairline of the mouthpiece can be seen above the reed.
  5. Gently tighten the ligature screws until they are firm. Do not overtighten!

Packing Up Carefully

Before putting your instrument back in its case after playing, do the following:

  1. Carefully remove the reed, wipe off excess moisture, and return it to the reed case. Remember, each reed costs at least $1.
  2. Remove the mouthpiece and wipe the inside with a clean cloth. Once a week, wash the mouthpiece with warm tap water. Dry thoroughly.
  3. Remove the neck and shake out the excess moisture. Dry with neck cleaner.
  4. Drop the weight of your chamois or cotton swab into the bell. Pull the swab through the body several times. Return the instrument to its case.
  5. You should have no other materials in your case, except for those it was designed to hold. Do not use force when closing your case or you could damage the saxophone.

Trumpet

Instrument Maintenance

To avoid damage, please take your time and be aware of your surroundings as your assemble and put away your instrument.

Assembling the Trumpet

  1. Put your left thumb and fingers around the valve casings and pick up the instrument.
  2. Place your left ring finger inside the ring of the third valve slide.
  3. Hold the mouthpiece at the wide end with your right hand. Gently twist the mouthpiece into the mouthpiece receiver.

How to Oil Valves

Valves need to be oiled occasionally. To oil your valves:

  1. Unscrew the valve at the top of the casing.
  2. Lift the valve half-way out of the casing.
  3. Apply a few drops of special brass valve oil to the exposed valve.
  4. Carefully return the valve to its casing. Turn the valve until it locks into place. When properly inserted, the top of the valve should easily screw back into place.

Grease Tuning Slides

Be sure to grease the slides regularly. Your director will recommend special slide grease and valve oil, and will help you apply them when necessary.

Packing Up Carefully

Before putting your instrument back in its case after playing, do the following:

  1. Press the water key and blow air through the mouthpiece to empty water from the instrument.
  2. Remove the mouthpiece. Once a week, wash the mouthpiece with warm tap water. Dry thoroughly.
  3. Wipe off the instrument with a clean, soft cloth. Return the instrument to its case.
  4. You should have no other materials in your case, except for those it was designed to hold. Do not use force when closing your case or you could damage the instrument.

French Horn

Instrument Maintenance

To avoid damage, please take your time and be aware of your surroundings as your assemble and put away your instrument.

Assembling the French Horn

  1. Hold the horn in your left hand, and place the bell of the instrument on your right thigh. The bell should point backwards, slightly angled to the right.
  2. Use your right hand to gently twist the mouthpiece into the mouthpiece receiver.

Packing Up Carefully

Before putting your instrument back in its case after playing, do the following:

  1. Press the water key and blow air through the mouthpiece to empty water from the instrument. If your horn does not have a water key, then remove the main tuning slide, rotate the instrument clockwise, and allow excess water to be removed.
  2. Remove the mouthpiece. Once a week, wash the mouthpiece with warm tap water. Dry thoroughly.
  3. Wipe off the instrument with a clean, soft cloth. Return the instrument to its case.
  4. You should have no other materials in your case, except for those it was designed to hold. Do not use force when closing your case or you could damage the instrument.

Trombone

Instrument Maintenance

To avoid damage, please take your time and be aware of your surroundings as your assemble and put away your instrument.

Assembling the Trombone

  1. Lock the slide by turning the slide lock ring to the right.
  2. Hold the bell in your left hand, the slide in your right hand, and carefully put the slide into the bell section at a 90° angle. Tighten the ribbed ring to hold the two sections together.
  3. Gently twist the mouthpiece into the mouthpiece receiver.

Packing Up Carefully

Before putting your instrument back in its case after playing, do the following:

  1. Press the water key and blow air through the mouthpiece to empty water from the instrument.
  2. Remove the mouthpiece and return it to the case.
  3. Make sure the slide is locked and unscrew the slide assembly. Do not take the outer slide off of the inner slide. Wipe off the instrument with a clean, soft cloth. Return the instrument to its case.
  4. Once a week, wash the mouthpiece with warm tap water. Dry thoroughly.
  5. You should have no other materials in your case, except for those it was designed to hold. Do not use force when closing your case or you could damage the instrument.

Baritone / Euphonium

Instrument Maintenance

To avoid damage, please take your time and be aware of your surroundings as your assemble and put away your instrument.

Assembling the Baritone

  1. Rest the euphonium across your lap with the mouthpiece receiver toward you.
  2. Gently twist the mouthpiece into the mouthpiece receiver.

How to Oil Valves

Euphonium valves occasionally need oiling. To oil your valves:

  1. Unscrew the valve at the top of the casing.
  2. Lift the valve half-way out of the casing.
  3. Apply a few drops of special brass valve oil to the exposed valve.
  4. Carefully return the valve to its casing. Turn the valve until it locks into place. When properly inserted, the top of the valve should easily screw back into place.

Grease Tuning Slides

Be sure to grease the slides regularly. Your director will recommend special slide grease and valve oil, and will help you apply them when necessary.

Packing Up Carefully

Before putting your instrument back in its case after playing, do the following:

  1. Press the water key and blow air through the mouthpiece to empty water from the instrument.
  2. Remove the mouthpiece and return it to the case.
  3. Once a week, wash the mouthpiece with warm tap water. Dry thoroughly.
  4. You should have no other materials in your case, except for those it was designed to hold. Do not use force when closing your case or you could damage the instrument.

Tuba

Instrument Maintenance

To avoid damage, please take your time and be aware of your surroundings as your assemble and put away your instrument.

Assembling the Tuba

  1. Rest the tuba across your lap with the mouthpiece receiver toward you.
  2. Gently twist the mouthpiece into the mouthpiece receiver.

How to Oil Valves

Tuba valves occasionally need oiling. To oil your valves:

  1. Unscrew the valve at the top of the casing.
  2. Lift the valve half-way out of the casing.
  3. Apply a few drops of special brass valve oil to the exposed valve.
  4. Carefully return the valve to its casing. Turn the valve until it locks into place. When properly inserted, the top of the valve should easily screw back into place.

Grease Tuning Slides

Be sure to grease the slides regularly. Your director will recommend special slide grease and valve oil, and will help you apply them when necessary.

Packing Up Carefully

Before putting your instrument back in its case after playing, do the following:

  1. Press the water key and blow air through the mouthpiece to empty water from the instrument.
  2. Remove the mouthpiece and return it to the case.
  3. Once a week, wash the mouthpiece with warm tap water. Dry thoroughly.
  4. You should have no other materials in your case, except for those it was designed to hold. Do not use force when closing your case or you could damage the instrument.

Percussion

Instrument Maintenance

To avoid damage, please take your time and be aware of your surroundings as your assemble and put away your instrument.

Assembling Percussion Equipment

Bells

  1. Stand in a comfortable position near the instrument. The raised keys should be pointing away from you. Make sure you have correct posture.
  2. If you are playing Orchestra Bells, set the instrument on a table or stand about waist high. The larger keys should be on the left.
  3. Adjust the music stand to about eye level. This enables you to easily read the music and watch the conductor.

Snare Drum

  1. Open the bottom legs of the snare drum stand. Lock them into place by tightening the tripod base screw. Grasp the bar and raise the stand below your waist. Tighten the height adjustment screw and lock into place.
  2. Put the two support bars closest together in front of you. Be sure they are even. If your stand has an adjustable arm, it should point away from you and be extended. The bars should be parallel to the ground. Tighten the angle adjustment screw.
  3. Carefully place the snare drum in the stand so the snare strainer level faces you.
  4. Slide the adjustable arm until it fits snugly against the shell of the drum. The top batter head should be slightly below your waist. Lock your drum stand into position. Tighten all screws each time you play.
  5. Tighten the snare strainer. Tap the head of the snare drum. If the sound is not crisp, tighten or loosen the tension control screw. The snares should rest lightly against the bottom head. Stand by the drum with correct posture.

Packing Up Carefully

Before putting your instrument back in its case after playing, do the following:

  1. Cover all percussion instruments when they are not being used.
  2. Put sticks and mallets away in the storage area.
  3. NEVER set down an object on top of a percussion instrument!
  4. You should have no other materials in your case, except for those it was designed to hold. Do not use force when closing your case or you could damage the instrument.

Contact Mr. Bell

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